Work on Border Mires now complete

Friday 9th February 2018

Staff and volunteers installing dams at Hummel Knowe, photo NWT

Northumberland Wildlife Trust Estates Officers and volunteers have been undertaking restoration work on the Border Mires in North Northumberland.

Northumberland Wildlife Trust Estates Officers and volunteers have been undertaking restoration work on the Border Mires in North Northumberland.

From autumn 2017 until this week, dams have been installed and sitka spruce removed (106 hectares cleared) on Hummel Knowe and The Wou, two of the toughest Border Mires sites to access.

The Border Mires are a collection of 58 peat bogs in and around Kielder Forest and are designated as Sites of Specific Scientific Interest (SSSI), Special Area for Conservation (SAC) and Ramsar sites (internationally important wetlands).

Upon completion, the team moved onto Butterburn Flow, a Northumberland Wildlife Trust reserve which is actually in Cumbria and the largest Border Mire, to restore bog erosion caused by historic over-grazing.

Coir dams were installed which will slow water movement and catch peat sediment. Areas of bare peat were then planted with small clumps of sphagnum taken from healthy areas of bog further into the site, which should spread quickly, and help further stabilize the peat.

Natural England funded the work with donations from an electricity distribution firm.