Northumberland Wildlife Trust believes it can save the red squirrel from extinction in the North East by stopping the spread of grey squirrels and managing the woodland landscape together with communities and landowners. But we can’t do it without your support.


Join Northumberland Wildlife Trust today.

By becoming a member of Northumberland Wildlife Trust you can become part of a conservation success story and not only benefit red squirrels in the region but many other much-loved birds, animals and plants too.


© Daniel Weatheritt



Together we can be the region's biggest force for nature conservation. As a thank you, members will receive:

  • Free access to over 60 wildlife reserves in the North East, including the Wildlife Discovery Centre at Hauxley, opening summer 2016.
  • Our magazine, Roebuck, which tells you about wildlife in the region and conservation news nationally.
  • Invitations and updates on events, activities and merchandise.
  • Children’s ‘Wildlife Watch’ materials including a handbook, magazines, posters, stickers and badges.
  • Regular updates on the red squirrel’s progress.

Show your support for red squirrels!


Sign up today by secure Direct Debit.  


 

If you’re already a Northumberland Wildlife Trust member, you can still show your support by donating to our red squirrel appeal, which is specifically aimed at addressing a shortfall in funding on red squirrel conservation. 

 



Three reasons to show your support today

  1. You can save the red squirrel from extinction in the North East We are reversing the decline of red squirrels and preventing the spread of grey squirrels.
  2. You can help fund the largest single species survey in the UK This is crucial to our understanding of red squirrel conservation and involves looking in over 300 sites.
  3. You can be part of a conservation success story Our efforts have seen red squirrels return to areas of Northumberland where they have not been seen for years.


© Daniel Weatheritt



Red squirrel and other images by Daniel Weatheritt